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How The Title Search Works

How The Title Search WorksA title search is an early warning system for buyers and lenders. It reveals flaws the owner must resolve prior to a closing or refinance request. This allows the owner to clear any issues on the title so that the process can move forward. Also, it protects the buyer or lender from assuming an obligation they aren’t responsible for. 

Title Search

A chain of title exists in the public records. It shows the history of property title transfer from each previous owner to the next. Unfortunately, these searches are labor intensive and require a specialist called a title examiner.

The search may take the title examiner back to a time when property laws were much different. Technically, only 40-60 previous years are required, but this may omit important information on older properties. Therefore, title examiners typically go back to the original owner.

Tax Search

The second step involves a search of tax records to ensure there are no unpaid taxes that could result in a tax lien on the property. The local municipality could hold buyers responsible if the taxes aren’t paid prior to the closing.

Inspection

If the title insurance is for a refinance loan, the lender often orders an inspection. The inspector examines the property to investigate whether there are any encroachments or other defects that affect the title. They also verify the lot size, note unrecorded easements and then mark the location of improvements.

Judgments

Judgment decrees, liens and unpaid federal taxes entail a claim on the property that supersedes a lender’s or buyer’s rights. Therefore, if discovered judgments create a cloud on the title, the current owner must resolve them before the transfer of title to the buyer.

Closing

The lender or buyer and seller can proceed with the closing after all defects have been cleared. However, the title company won’t issue a commitment to insure the property if clouds remain on the title. 

Understanding how the title process works can make the closing process easier and might make buyers a little more patient while waiting for the title commitment to arrive. 

Your trusted real estate agent and home mortgage professional will be there to guide you through the process and help you communicate effectively with your lender. These partnerships can be a key element in your successful transaction.

5 Home-Buying Pitfalls To Avoid

5 Home-Buying Pitfalls To AvoidBuying your home can be nerve-racking, especially if it’s the first time. The buying process is exciting and often complex. The chances of making a mistake are relatively high. 

In today’s real estate market where demand surpasses supply, you can’t afford to make mistakes. And this is just the tip of the iceberg.

If you are in the market to buy a house, here are five pitfalls avoid. 

Not Doing Your Homework Well 

Fortune favors the prepared in real estate. And preparedness begins with understanding your finances. A wise buyer examines assets, analyzes debts and gets finances pre-approved before jumping into the house hunt. 

Know the neighborhood well, since you’re also buying a location. It’s paramount to research about the quality of schools, upcoming zoning issues and crime level. Not all suburb spots are ideal to live in.

Picking The Wrong Mortgage 

Getting your loan preapproved puts you in a better position to negotiate. Find out how much property you can afford. Don’t rely on your bank’s internet site only. Instead, use calculators and consult with your trusted mortgage professional to find out how much you can borrow. 

It’s worth noting that what banks show they can lend can differ from what they will lend. As such, it’s imperative to choose your mortgage carefully. Compare offers from various banks or consult an independent finance broker. 

Going With The Market Flow 

Resist the temptation to flow with the market rather than your needs. The real estate market goes in cycles. There are times suitable for buyers, and times suitable for sellers. 

However, don’t gamble with your future by sitting and waiting for the right time. Once you know your budget, get your finances organized, think about your needs now and in future. Then use short term market conditions to make long-term lifestyle choices. 

Exceeding Your Budget 

Most homebuyers fall for the trap of picking more appealing properties that cost more than their budgets. Falling into this pitfall can derail your future finances. 

Although it’s human nature to yearn for more than we can afford, resist the desire. Surpassing your budget exposes you to potential financial shocks with bigger payments, property taxes and more.

Falling In Love 

If you find the perfect house, keep it to yourself. Don’t let the sellers read your emotions. If they do, they may use them against you while negotiating. 

Wise buyers know there are several homes out there, and there is one that’s right for them. If you can’t afford one or your offer isn’t accepted, keep looking and move on. 

Buying a home is rejuvenating. However, if you’re not careful, you can make mistakes you may regret later. Be sure to consult with your trusted real estate expert and trusted mortgage professional to get the best advice for your situation. 

 

 

NAHB: Home Builder Confidence Grows After Lowest Level in 3 Years

NAHB Home Builder Confidence Grows After Lowest Level in 3 YearsAfter two months of declining builder confidence, the National Association of Home Builders Housing Market Index gained two points in January with a reading of 58. Component readings of the HMI were also higher with builder confidence in current market conditions rose two points to an index reading of 63. Builder confidence in housing market conditions over the next six months rose three points to 64.

The index for buyer traffic in new housing developments rose one point to 44. While index readings above 50 indicate positive market conditions, the index reading for buyer traffic is typically lower than 50.

Lower Mortgage Rates Compel Home Buyers to Act

Falling mortgage rates contributed to the uptick in home builder confidence, but affordability continued to impact first-time and moderate-income home buyers. Robert Dietz, NAHB chief economist, said: “Builders need to continue to manage rising construction costs to keep home prices affordable, particularly for young buyers at the entry level of the market.”

Analysts suggested that builders could consider offering deeper discounts and incentives to buyers to increase sales of new homes. Homes not sold during November and December added to current inventories of new homes available, which provides home buyers with more choices and less competition for homes.

Home Builders Expect More Buyer Traffic

Lennar Corporation, a major home builder said that increased buyer traffic indicated that 2019 home sales would increase and that improving economic conditions were expected to improve housing market conditions and home sales in 2019.

Builders expect to face continued headwinds in 2019; affordability tops the list, but relatively low inventories of homes in some areas dampen buyer enthusiasm. Single-family housing starts are also expected to be lower than the long-term yearly average. As economic conditions improve for would-be home buyers, a slim supply of homes and high home prices present obstacles to buyers.

Your trusted real estate agent is one of your best partners in your next home buying or selling transaction. Be sure to contact them to discuss market conditions in your area.

What Happens After Your Offer Is Accepted?

What Happens After Your Offer Is AcceptedWhen you make an offer on a home, you wait anxiously to see if it will be accepted. Sometimes you’re lucky enough to hear back within hours. Other times you could wait days or even weeks.

But once you get that good news that your offer has been accepted, what happens next? It’s a common question, and one that your real estate agent can help you with. In general though, here’s what you can expect.

There’s A Home Inspection

A home inspection needs to be conducted in order to assess the condition of the home for financing needs. This is a stage where some issues might come up that require negotiation. If serious problems are reported on the home inspection report, you could try to negotiate a lower price with the seller, but they don’t have to agree to that. 

There’s A Lender Home Appraisal

A lender appraisal will also have to be done. This is when the lender asks a third party to come out and assess the financial value of the home. If the appraisal comes out well, you could get approved for the selling price. But if the appraisal comes out lower than the selling price, you could have a hard time getting a mortgage unless the seller is willing to come down in price.

You’ll Go To The Closing

Now’s the time to get your financing finished up. If you’ve been pre-approved, that’s great. But your pre-approval may only be conditional. That is, it may be contingent on your financial situation to be completely in order. The full approval process may unveil something that needs to be corrected before you actually get final documents for the home purchase.

Once the documents are issued, you will go to the loan closing to sign the documents.  This usually happens with a third party closing agent or escrow company that ensure everything is in order.

The final word is that a lot can happen between having your offer accepted and actually getting the keys to your new home. That’s why it’s absolutely essential to work with a trusted home mortgage professional and a licensed real estate agent when buying a new home. They’ll be able to navigate you through any of the rough spots that happen along the way. And while there are things that can go wrong along the way, chances are great that eventually you’ll be able to happily call yourself a homeowner!

Big Cities vs. Secondary Markets: Where to Buy?

Big Cities vs. Secondary Markets Where to BuyAtlanta, Charlotte, New York and Los Angeles are always on the real estate radar because of big ticket sales and good media coverage. The secondary markets – those markets without the celebrity undertones – may actually be better deals. With the price of borrowing money rising and occupation rates dropping in primary markets, places like Nashville and Birmingham are looking better to investors.

Where Are the Secondary Markets?

A secondary market is generally defined as a mid size or large city that has recorded an uptick in growth in the immediate past. They do not have quite the economic clout or media presence of a primary market, although they may rival each other in terms of population.

Generally, the influx of new attention for a secondary market will be from young professionals. These are people who are upwardly mobile and seeking new forms of skilled employment. This is what has driven the markets of cities like San Antonio, San Jose, San Diego, Phoenix and Philadelphia to new heights in recent years.

What Do Experts Think?

Experts believe that primary markets have topped out for the time being. With occupancy rates dropping from highs in the lower 90 percentiles, primary markets are just too saturated for their own good. Landlords in these areas are more unwilling to lower rents in these areas, because there are usually more high income earners established there who want to stay in the area to keep a legacy job or maintain a family.

Rising real estate prices and interest rates also put the primary housing market out of the reach of many outsiders. Researchers have found that doing real estate business in a secondary market can provide an investor with a 16% premium. The cost of real estate itself is around 38% lower. So are the costs of maintaining a property (energy costs 22% lower; labor costs 14% lower).

The New Primary Markets?

With respect to income, secondary market housing prices are up to 45% more affordable. Individuals notice this, and so do commercial investors and developers. This is why the mad rush to cities like Phoenix and San Diego will be red hot for the next few years, say investors, even in relation to established cities like Los Angeles and New York.

No matter where you are looking to purchase your new home, you can rely on your trusted real estate professional to help you locate your dream property options. 

Differences Between A Short Sale And A Foreclosure

Differences Between A Short Sale And A ForeclosureIf you’re looking to get an untraditional deal on a new home purchase, you may encounter either a short sale or a foreclosure. These two terms refer to sales that are not usual. As a homebuyer, it’s important to understand the differences between them and how each one might affect your buying experience.

What’s A Short Sale?

A short sale is a situation where the owner has a strong motivation to hurry up and sell their home. In so doing, they’re willing to sell for less than what they owe on the house. Homeowners have a variety of reasons why they might do a short sale. Their reasons might include a personal emergency, or they might be trying to protect themselves against a future foreclosure.

In a short sale, the owner’s lender has to be apprised of the plan. In many cases, the lender is supportive of the short sale, since it keeps them from having to go through the long and expensive process of a foreclosure.

Short sales can represent great deals for buyers. However, since this type of sale is so unusual, the process of buying often takes a much longer time than a regular home purchase. You’ll need to be patient, but if the sale does go through, your patience can pay off.

What’s A Foreclosure?

A foreclosure is a situation where the owner’s lender is forcing the sale of the property due to unpaid mortgage payments. The lender is essentially taking back ownership of the property. The bank then puts the home up for sale as a foreclosure, and is the official seller of the property.

A foreclosure property may offer a good deal for a buyer, but the process may be long and drawn-out. Since the seller is the lender, they are not in any particular hurry to sell a property, and the transaction can be very complicated.

If you’re interested in buying a short sale or a foreclosure, you should look for a real estate agent that specializes in these types of transactions. Your real estate agent can help you to successfully navigate through all the red tape that short sales and foreclosures inherently have.