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The Top Reasons To Pay Off Your Mortgage Before You Retire

The Top Reasons To Pay Off Your Mortgage Before You RetireAs you get closer to your retirement age, you should try to discharge as much of your debt as possible. Unfortunately, many people close to the age of retirement still have a significant mortgage balance they need to pay off. What are some of the top reasons why you should pay off your mortgage before you retire?

Your Portfolio Might Not Generate As Much Interest

You may have a very low rate on your mortgage, which means that your money is better served in the stock market; however, as you approach the age of retirement, your portfolio might not generate as much interest because you are shifting more of your assets into less risky investments. As a result, you might want to pay down your mortgage faster, as the interest rate between your mortgage and your portfolio is no longer as large.

Free Up More Cash

You should also try to pay off your mortgage because you will free up more cash. You want to enjoy your golden years, but if you are still spending thousands of dollars every month paying off your mortgage, your money will not go as far. You may not be ready to tap into those retirement accounts just yet, so you can generate more cash by paying off your mortgage now. Try to pay off your mortgage before you retire to maximize your golden years.

Tap Into Your Home Equity Later

Do not forget that your house can also be a very important retirement asset. If you are concerned about running out of money and your retirement account, you can tap into your home equity as an extra source of cash; however, what if you still have a mortgage on your house? You might not have as much equity to use. While you are still making money now, you should try to pay off your mortgage.

Pay Off Your Mortgage Before You Retire

Clearly, there are a lot of reasons why you should try to pay off your mortgage before you retire. When you retire, your income may drop significantly, so you should try to pay off your mortgage while you still have the flexibility to do so right now. 

 

Amortization: What You Need To Know About How Your Loan Is Paid Off

Amortization: What you need to know about how your loan is paid offIf you own a home, you will see a lot of information about your payment schedule. It specifies exactly what payments you have to make, when you have to make them, and how much of each payment will go toward your principal and interest. This is called an amortization schedule, and it is typically designed in such a way that your last payment pays off your loan down to the penny. How does this impact the life of your loan?

Most Of Your First Few Payments Go Toward The Interest

During the first few years, the majority of each payment is going to be directed toward the interest that you owe. Then, as you pay off more of the loan, the balance will generally shift to the principal. By the end of your amortization schedule, almost all of your payments are going to go toward principal, with very little of each payment going toward interest. If you make additional payments ahead of schedule, those payments should go toward the principal on your loan.

How Lenders Calculate How Much You Owe

Your mortgage lender is going to collect a lot of information about your financial history. This might include your proof of employment, your credit score, and your bank statements. Then, they will calculate the interest rate on the loan. They will use this information to draw up an amortization table, figuring out how much interest you will pay every month based on your interest rate. Finally, your lender will figure out how much of each payment will be applied to your interest and principal.

Why An Amortization Schedule Matters For Your Mortgage

There are several reasons why your amortization schedule is so important. First, it dictates how quickly you build up equity in your home. The faster you build up equity, the more financial freedom you have. You might want to draw on your home equity for certain purchases down the road, and you want to maximize the amount of money you get back when you sell your house. Furthermore, your amortization schedule gives you peace of mind, knowing that your monthly payments are going to be the same over the life of the mortgage. 

Amortization: What You Need To Know About How Your Loan Is Paid Off

Amortization: What you need to know about how your loan is paid offIf you own a home, you will see a lot of information about your payment schedule. It specifies exactly what payments you have to make, when you have to make them, and how much of each payment will go toward your principal and interest. This is called an amortization schedule, and it is typically designed in such a way that your last payment pays off your loan down to the penny. How does this impact the life of your loan?

Most Of Your First Few Payments Go Toward The Interest

During the first few years, the majority of each payment is going to be directed toward the interest that you owe. Then, as you pay off more of the loan, the balance will generally shift to the principal. By the end of your amortization schedule, almost all of your payments are going to go toward principal, with very little of each payment going toward interest. If you make additional payments ahead of schedule, those payments should go toward the principal on your loan.

How Lenders Calculate How Much You Owe

Your mortgage lender is going to collect a lot of information about your financial history. This might include your proof of employment, your credit score, and your bank statements. Then, they will calculate the interest rate on the loan. They will use this information to draw up an amortization table, figuring out how much interest you will pay every month based on your interest rate. Finally, your lender will figure out how much of each payment will be applied to your interest and principal.

Why An Amortization Schedule Matters For Your Mortgage

There are several reasons why your amortization schedule is so important. First, it dictates how quickly you build up equity in your home. The faster you build up equity, the more financial freedom you have. You might want to draw on your home equity for certain purchases down the road, and you want to maximize the amount of money you get back when you sell your house. Furthermore, your amortization schedule gives you peace of mind, knowing that your monthly payments are going to be the same over the life of the mortgage. 

Closing Costs And A Cash Sale: Who Pays?

Closing Costs And A Cash Sale: Who Pays?There are some people who are able to pay cash for a home. Typically, these are individuals who are selling an existing property that has gone up in value. Now, all of a sudden, they have a lot of extra money they can spend on a house. If you can pay cash for a home, you have a lot of extra negotiating power. When it is time to complete the sale, who pays?

What Is Included In Closing Costs?

Before deciding who pays closing expenses, it is important to take a look at what is included. Because you do not have to worry about going through a lender, you can avoid many of the fees associated with the process of buying a home. Examples include origination fees, processing fees, credit checks, and mortgage points.

On the other hand, there are several other expenses you might have to cover. For example, you will have to put down some earnest money, and you might have to pay for a property inspection and appraisal. You should also pay for title insurance and a title search. There are some states that require you to work with an attorney, and you may have to pay attorney’s fees as well. Finally, you might also be responsible for notary expenses and certain escrow fees. Keep in mind that these expenses can vary from state to state. 

Who Pays For These Costs?

Because there are still several expenses you need to pay, you will need to work with the seller to decide who was responsible for them. In a lot of situations, these costs are the responsibility of the buyer. 

At the same time, it is a matter up for debate. If you believe you have a lot of negotiating power, you might be able to convince the seller to pay for these expenses. For example, if the house has been on the market for a long time and the seller does not have any other offers, you might convince the seller to cover your closing expenses. You may want to work with a real estate agent who can help you figure out if you can convince the seller to cover these expenses. 

A Non-QM Mortgage: What Does This Mean?

A Non-QM Mortgage: What Does This Mean?If you are interested in purchasing a house, you need to review all of the offers available. The vast majority of loan officers are going to talk about something called qualifying mortgages, which is usually shortened to QM. You may be asking, what is a non-qualifying mortgage? This is usually shortened to Non-QM, and it simply means that the loan does not conform with the rules and regulations put in place by the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau, usually shortened to CFPB. What are the differences between a QM and Non-QM mortgage, and which one is right for your needs?

A Qualified Mortgage Generally Provides More Protection

In general, a qualified mortgage (QM) typically provides you with a greater degree of protection. The loan has to conform to certain standards. This means that the loan cannot last longer than 30 years, there cannot be any prepayment penalties, it cannot be a balloon loan, and it should not have any negative amortization features. At the same time, qualifying for a QM mortgage can be more difficult, as lenders have to follow all of the rules and regulations set forth by the government. This includes verifying bank statements, income, W2s, and numerous other examples of documentation.

A Non-QM Mortgage May Provide More Flexibility

You may want to take a look at Non-QM mortgages because they might offer more flexibility. These are very useful for gig workers that do not qualify for QM loans. Another reason is, you might want to lengthen the loan term to 40 years. Or, you might be interested in a loan that only requires you to pay interest, particularly if you are a real estate investor. This is also an option available to foreign nationals who would like to buy property in the United States. On the other hand, you should talk to a professional who can review the risks of a Non-QM mortgage as well.

Find The Best Loan Option For Your Needs

Ultimately, it is critical to review the benefits and drawbacks of each option before you make a decision. The right loan for one person might not necessarily be the right loan for you. If you talk to an expert, you can review all of the options available and put yourself in the best position possible to qualify for a home loan. 

 

A Non-QM Mortgage: What Does This Mean?

A Non-QM Mortgage: What Does This Mean?If you are interested in purchasing a house, you need to review all of the offers available. The vast majority of loan officers are going to talk about something called qualifying mortgages, which is usually shortened to QM. You may be asking, what is a non-qualifying mortgage? This is usually shortened to Non-QM, and it simply means that the loan does not conform with the rules and regulations put in place by the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau, usually shortened to CFPB. What are the differences between a QM and Non-QM mortgage, and which one is right for your needs?

A Qualified Mortgage Generally Provides More Protection

In general, a qualified mortgage (QM) typically provides you with a greater degree of protection. The loan has to conform to certain standards. This means that the loan cannot last longer than 30 years, there cannot be any prepayment penalties, it cannot be a balloon loan, and it should not have any negative amortization features. At the same time, qualifying for a QM mortgage can be more difficult, as lenders have to follow all of the rules and regulations set forth by the government. This includes verifying bank statements, income, W2s, and numerous other examples of documentation.

A Non-QM Mortgage May Provide More Flexibility

You may want to take a look at Non-QM mortgages because they might offer more flexibility. These are very useful for gig workers that do not qualify for QM loans. Another reason is, you might want to lengthen the loan term to 40 years. Or, you might be interested in a loan that only requires you to pay interest, particularly if you are a real estate investor. This is also an option available to foreign nationals who would like to buy property in the United States. On the other hand, you should talk to a professional who can review the risks of a Non-QM mortgage as well.

Find The Best Loan Option For Your Needs

Ultimately, it is critical to review the benefits and drawbacks of each option before you make a decision. The right loan for one person might not necessarily be the right loan for you. If you talk to an expert, you can review all of the options available and put yourself in the best position possible to qualify for a home loan.